Archive for the ‘ field ’ Category

Applying ‘fields’ and ‘habitus’ to Researching Cultural Entrepreneurs

As part of my research of Birmingham based cultural entrepreneurs, I aim to highlight the context in which they operate by outlining some key policies and selecting a few important developments and projects. I identify that cultural entrepreneurs are not working in a vacuum but that the language of enterprise, an emphasis on economic development and the role of the cultural industries as part of the city is an important factor in the space of production.

Bourdieu’s notion of a ‘fields of production’ is revealed through the policies, powerful agencies and is linked to ‘habitus’ represented by the networks of individual cultural entrepreneurs who play a role in influencing the ‘field’ by creating their own projects, blogs and events. There is a sense that spaces associated with the cultural industries, either through individuals or through policy making, have much in common. But which comes first, the strategy or the activities of cultural entrepreneurs? Continue reading

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Shall we explore Bourdieu or not?

That’s the question that my colleague, Steve Harding and I discussed this afternoon while working on a paper for the ISBE conference. One fo the reasons why we are not sure if it would be helpful to use Bourdieu’s theory of habitus and field is because we are not clear about his work – neither of us have studied Bourdieu. As a brief introduction, I thought this clip from You Tube was quite helpful:

We are exploring relational entrepreneurial learning for creative industries students. We draw on the authors Chell and Karatas-Ozkan (2012) who argue that entrepreneurial practice does not take place in a vacuum but is embedded in a social context represented by a complex web of strong and weak ties depending on the individual’s position in a network. I dont know if we will end up using Bourdieu but, I think that his framework does offer a way of unpicking the power relationships, the ‘rules’ and individual roles in the social networks we are discussing for this paper.

In my last blog post I finished by asking: How is identity created and what are the modes of conduct? How, as a researcher, can this be observed, analysed and interpreted? Still using Du Gay, I shall attempt to explore these questions further. Specifically, I am interested in the implications for developing a methodology to explore cultural entrepreneurs. Continue reading