Archive for the ‘ creative industries ’ Category

My lit review plan

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Shall we explore Bourdieu or not?

That’s the question that my colleague, Steve Harding and I discussed this afternoon while working on a paper for the ISBE conference. One fo the reasons why we are not sure if it would be helpful to use Bourdieu’s theory of habitus and field is because we are not clear about his work – neither of us have studied Bourdieu. As a brief introduction, I thought this clip from You Tube was quite helpful:

We are exploring relational entrepreneurial learning for creative industries students. We draw on the authors Chell and Karatas-Ozkan (2012) who argue that entrepreneurial practice does not take place in a vacuum but is embedded in a social context represented by a complex web of strong and weak ties depending on the individual’s position in a network. I dont know if we will end up using Bourdieu but, I think that his framework does offer a way of unpicking the power relationships, the ‘rules’ and individual roles in the social networks we are discussing for this paper.

In my last blog post I finished by asking: How is identity created and what are the modes of conduct? How, as a researcher, can this be observed, analysed and interpreted? Still using Du Gay, I shall attempt to explore these questions further. Specifically, I am interested in the implications for developing a methodology to explore cultural entrepreneurs. Continue reading

‘cool’ work

There is perception that working in the creative and cultural industries is ‘cool’, pleasurable and a good lifestyle choice. It allows personal autonomy and expression.  Or does it?

The paper entitled ‘Looking for work in creative industries policy’ published in the International Journal of Cultural Policy by Mark Banks and David Hesmondalgh takes a critical look at the issues related with creative work. More specifically, they are focused on UK creative industries policy of the last 10 years (under New Labour) and the lack of research and debate about the conditions of work for creative workers. This is pertinent to my PhD research on Cultural Entrepreneurship because it questions the relationship between recent government policy and the practice of working in the creative and cultural industries. A short research study I undertook 2 years ago demonstrated clearly that some creative workers are very comfortable with the idea of entrepreneurship and enjoy the lifestyle which goes with it. Yet, to what extent have they been manipulated? Have they had the option to think and discuss their conditions of work? Continue reading